Experience options

There is a handscroll in the alcove. Please read the instructions the experience written on the handscroll in the spirit of playing a game. Please create the experience of your choice and make it into a travel memory of your visit to the Kimono Experience Hall.

RecommendedO-oku Plan, Proud Beauty

* This is a plan for customers who tried the furisode kimono experience.

O-oku Plan
What is an o-oku?
Up until the Edo period, castles all over Japan had an o-oku, a kind of historical organization composed of women and headed by the castellan's legal wife, and whose function was to house traditions and family events.
Castellans throughout Japan would have had many women around them who played roles on a wide range of levels.
The women who were members of the o-oku were expected to behave elegantly and give birth to and rear children for the castellan within the samurai family framework. O-okus were a kind of organization unique to Japan, and to women in samurai society, and served to support the foundation of the Japanese family system and produce heirs.
The o-oku was divided into a "seishitsu" and a "sokushitsu", the role of the latter being to assist the former. Whereas the "seishitsu" was a kind of formal entity, the existence of a "sokushitsu" was proof of the eternal prosperity of the family system.
Various kinds of women worked in a castle's o-oku, from underservants who had yet to learn their p's and q's to women in management roles who knew how to walk elegantly with their backs straight while wearing an "uchikake" kimono, and radiated a beauty full of the pride of being a lady in the o-oku.
What you will experience with the O-oku Plan.
  • Part 1:
    Wearing a heavy silk uchikake (robe) that trails behind your furisode-style kimono, straighten your back and assume a dignified pose as you walk straight down the tatami corridor, toes pointed inward. A staff member will announce, “——hime no otori degozaimasu!” and you will say using your own name, “——hime ni gozaimasuru” as you immerse yourself in the atmosphere of the Ooku. Try learning how to avoid stepping on the hem of your uchikake as you walk around corners. Be sure to capture your lavish appearance on your own camera. Our staff members will assist you in taking the picture.
  • Part 2:
    There is a rule followed by old families in the Japanese countryside that still applies today. This rule requires a bride to approach the family altar, juzu prayer beads in hand, and deliver a greeting to their ancestors. Immerse yourself in this solemn mood as you learn the rules for carrying out this custom. Sit in the traditional seiza style in front of a family altar that has been designated an important cultural property of Takayama.

Price¥3,000 (excluding tax)

Learn the art of Yamato-nadeshiko (being a noblewoman)

Perform the etiquette for standing and sitting while dressed in a kimono.
Walk straight with your toes pointing inward to avoid stepping on the heri (edge) of the tatami mats. Sit in front of the fusuma (sliding door) and learn how to open it.
After closing the fusuma, go to the sitting room, sit down in the traditional seiza style, put three fingers from each hand on the floor, and bow while smiling and speaking a greeting in the local dialect.

Price¥500 (excluding tax)

Learn the art of Yamato-nadeshiko (being a noblewoman)

Learn how to play the taiko drum

Enjoy the distinctive sound of the taiko drum. Since we have two drums, you may try playing them in pairs. Learn how to play them with the distinctive taiko rhythm. (Limited to about 10 minutes.)

Price¥500 (excluding tax)

Learn how to play the taiko drum

Learn the art of cloth-folding

Learn various styles and methods for folding cloth, including knotless hira-zutsumi, which uses a single square of cloth; otsukai-zutsumi, which makes use of knot aesthetics; and yotsu-musubi, which is used for carrying heavy objects.

Price¥500 (excluding tax)

Learn the art of cloth-folding

Learn the art of kimono-folding

Fold a kimono, wrap it in tatoshi (kimono wrapping paper), and place it in a dresser. Learn how to take care of valuable kimonos.

Price¥500 (excluding tax)

Learn the art of kimono-folding

Learn how to approach a family altar

To approach a family altar, wear a traditional Japanese kimono, sit on a floor cushion in the traditional seiza style, and hold juzu prayer beads in your hand. This family altar, which belongs to the Mori family and has a long history, has been designated an important cultural property of Hida Takayama and is not connected with any religious beliefs. Approach slowly and do not touch it. Pray that you will enjoy your visit to Japan even more. Your prayer may very well come true!

Price¥500 (excluding tax)

Learn how to approach a family altar
Please enjoy the options as if you were playing a game.

(※)Visitors who do not try the kimono experience (and any gentlemen accompanying them) will only be able to participate in the options.